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BTNF Alerts & Closures Current Fire Danger is Low

Recreating With Dogs

Recreating With Dogs

Dogs dig the BTNF. The BTNF welcomes dogs. Because of the wildlife that lives on the forest and the critical watersheds in the forest, being a dog parent on the…

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Backcountry Skiing

Earn Your Turns on the BTNF.     Backcountry skiing (also known as ski touring) is a type of skiing done in areas in which there are no lifts, no…

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Offroad Travel

  There are hundreds of miles of designated roads and trails open to OHVs (off-highway vehicles) on the BTNF. OHV recreation must occur on designated routes only. All roads and…

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How to Build a Campfire

  Campfires bring warmth and light, but are not to be taken lightly. If not built properly, they can degrade the landscape; if not properly extinguished, they can cause a…

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How to Poop in the Woods

Yes, you see poop everywhere in the forest. Wild animals poop anywhere they want, and many trails are dotted with the poop of stock animals. This poop isn’t a problem….

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Camping

A guide to sleeping under the stars in developed campgrounds, dispersed camping areas, or the backcountry of the BTNF. The opportunities to camp in the Bridger-Teton are almost limitless and…

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Hunting

Sport shooting and hunting are welcomed on the BTNF.   Hunting The Wyoming Department of Game & Fish manages hunting and fishing opportunities across the state, including on the BTNF,…

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Fishing

Fishing on the Forest Twenty-five species of fish, including 7 different species of trout (lake, golden, brook, rainbow, brown, cutthroat, and grayling), live in more streams, alpine lakes, rivers, and…

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Wildlife Watching

See animals as wild as the landscape. The BTNF is an instrumental part of the 15+ million Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. You might have heard or read that the GYE is…

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Leave No Trace

  Although the Leave No Trace nonprofit organization was incorporated in 1994, the ideas it promotes—care, responsibility, and stewardship for the outdoors—are not new. Many Native American and Indigenous cultures…

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We acknowledge with respect that our facilities are situated on the aboriginal land of the Shoshone Bannock. Eastern Shoshone. Northern Arapaho. Crow. Assiniboine. Sioux. Gros Ventre. Nez Perce.

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